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Publications by
Benjamin Grabiger

All publications of HI Jena

2022

B. Marx-Glowna, B. Grabiger, R. Loetzsch, I. Uschmann, A. T. Schmitt, K. S. Schulze, A. Last, T. Roth, S. Antipov, H.-P. Schlenvoigt, I. Sergueev, O. Leupold, R. Roehlsberger, and G. G. Paulus
Scanning high-sensitive x-ray polarization microscopy
New Journal of Physics 24, 053051 (2022)

Abstract: We report on the realization of an extremely sensitive x-ray polarization microscope, allowing to detect tiniest polarization changes of 1 in 100 billion (10(-11)) with a mu m-size focused beam. The extreme degree of polarization purity places the most stringent requirements on the orientation of the polarizer and analyzer crystals as well as the composition and the form fidelity of the lenses, which must not exhibit any birefringence. The results show that these requirements are currently only met by polymer lenses. Highly sensitive scanning x-ray polarization microscopy thus is established as a new method. It can provide new insights in a wide range of applications ranging from quantum electrodynamics and quantum optics to x-ray spectroscopy, materials research, and laser physics.

K. Schulze, B. Grabiger, R. Loetzsch, B. Marx-Glowna, A. Schmitt, A. Garcia, W. Hippler, L. Huang, F. Karbstein, Z. Konopková, H.-P. Schlenvoigt, J.-P. Schwinkendorf, C. Strohm, T. Toncian, I. Uschmann, H.-C. Wille, U. Zastrau, R. Röhlsberger, T. Stöhlker, T. Cowan, and G. Paulus
Towards perfectly linearly polarized x-rays
Physical Review Research 4, 013220 (2022)

Abstract: In recent years, high-precision x-ray polarimeters have become a key method for the investigation of fundamental physical questions from solid-state physics to quantum optics. Here, we report on the verification of a polarization purity of better than 8×10−11 at an x-ray free-electron laser, which implies a suppression of the incoming photons to the noise level in the crossed polarizer setting. This purity provides exceptional sensitivity to tiny polarization changes and offers intriguing perspectives for fundamental tests of quantum electrodynamics.

2021

A. T. Schmitt, Y. Joly, K. S. Schulze, B. Marx-Glowna, I. Uschmann, B. Grabiger, H. Bernhardt, R. Lötzsch, A. Juhin, J. Debray, H.-C. Wille, H. Yavaş, G. G. Paulus, and R. Röhlsberger
Disentangling x-ray dichroism and birefringence via high-purity polarimetry
Optica 8, 56 (2021)

Abstract: High-brilliance synchrotron radiation sources have opened new avenues for x-ray polarization analysis that go far beyond conventional polarimetry in the optical domain. With linear x-ray polarizers in a crossed setting, polarization extinction ratios down to 10⁻¹⁰ can be achieved. This renders the method sensitive to probe the tiniest optical anisotropies that would occur, for example, in strong-field quantum electrodynamics due to vacuum birefringence and dichroism. Here we show that high-purity polarimetry can be employed to reveal electronic anisotropies in condensed matter systems with utmost sensitivity and spectral resolution. Taking CuO and La₂CuO₄ as benchmark systems, we present a full characterization of the polarization changes across the Cu K-absorption edge and their separation into dichroic and birefringent contributions. At diffraction-limited synchrotron radiation sources and x-ray lasers, where polarization extinction ratios of 10⁻¹² can be achieved, our method has the potential to assess birefringence and dichroism of the quantum vacuum in extreme electromagnetic fields.

2020

B. Grabiger, B. Marx-Glowna, I. Uschmann, R. Loetzsch, G. Paulus, and K. Schulze
A highly sensitive imaging polarimeter in the x-ray regime
Applied Physics Letters 117, 201102 (2020)

Abstract: We report on the development of a highly sensitive imaging polarimeter that allows for the investigation of polarization changing properties of materials in the x-ray regime. By combining a microfocus rotating anode, collimating multilayer mirrors, and two germanium polarizer crystals, we achieved a polarization purity of the two orthogonal linear polarization states of 8 × 10−8. This enables the detection of an ellipticity on the same order or a rotation of the polarization plane of 6 arcsec. The high sensitivity combined with the imaging techniques allows us to study the microcrystalline structure of materials. As an example, we investigated beryllium sheets of different grades, which are commonly used for fabricating x-ray lenses, with a spatial resolution of 200 μm, and observed a strong degradation of the polarization purity due to the polycrystalline nature of beryllium. This makes x-ray lenses made of beryllium unsuitable for imaging polarimeter with higher spatial resolution. The results are important for the development of x-ray optical instruments that combine high spatial resolution and high sensitivity to polarization.

H. Bernhardt, A. Schmitt, B. Grabiger, B. Marx-Glowna, R. Loetzsch, H.-C. Wille, D. Bessas, A. Chumakov, R. Rüffer, R. Röhlsberger, T. Stöhlker, I. Uschmann, G. Paulus, and K. Schulze
Ultra-high precision x-ray polarimetry with artificial diamond channel cuts at the beam divergence limit
Physical Review Research 2, 023365 (2020)

Abstract: We report on the use of synthetic single-crystal diamonds for high definition x-ray polarimetry. The diamonds are precision mounted to form artificial channel-cut crystals (ACCs). Each ACC supports four consecutive reflections with a scattering angle 2ΘB of 90°. We achieved a polarization purity of 3.0×10−10 at beamline ID18 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). When the x-ray beam's horizontal divergence was reduced through additional collimation from 17 to 8.4μrad, the polarization purity improved to 1.4×10−10. Precision x-ray polarimetry thus has reached the limit, where the purity is determined by the divergence of the beam. In particular, this result is important for polarimetry at fourth generation x-ray sources, which provide diffraction-limited x-ray beams. The sensitivity expected as a consequence of the present work will pave the way for exploring new physics such as the investigation of vacuum birefringence.

2016

H. Bernhardt, B. Marx-Glowna, K. Schulze, B. Grabiger, J. Haber, C. Detlefs, R. Lötzsch, T. Kämpfer, R. Röhlsberger, E. Förster, Th. Stöhlker, I. Uschmann, and G. G. Paulus
High purity x-ray polarimetry with single-crystal diamonds
Applied Physics Letters 109, 121106 (2016)

Abstract: We report on the use of synthetic single-crystal diamonds for high purity x-ray polarimetry to improve the polarization purity of present-day x-ray polarimeters. The polarimeter setup consists of a polarizer and an analyzer, each based on two parallel diamond crystals used at a Bragg angle close to 45°. The experiment was performed using one (400) Bragg reflection on each diamond crystal and synchrotron undulator radiation at an x-ray energy of 9838.75 eV. A polarization purity of 8.9 × 10−10 was measured at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, which is the best value reported for two-reflection polarizer/analyzer setups. This result is encouraging and is a first step to improve the resolution of x-ray polarimeters further by using diamond crystal polarizers and analyzers with four or six consecutive reflections.